Research Paper Series

Show Results:
Results 1 - 10 of 10
Year RPS # Title Author/s
2006 2006-010 (BP) ADVANCED TISSUE SCIENCES INC. - COVERING THE WOUNDS WITHOUT THE FINANCES Nitin Pangarkar, Dietmar W Hutmacher & Avinav Nigam

After operating for several months under bankruptcy protection, Advanced Tissues Sciences (ATS) was liquidated on 31st March 2003.  The company’s bankruptcy and liquidation seemed surprising to many observers in view of its success on several fronts including raising capital (more than $300 mil over a period of 15 years); inventiveness (more than 40 patents); the importance of the technologies it was trying to develop (treatment of burn victims) and ability to attract high profile partners (such as Smith and Nephew and Medtronic).  Observers and analysts were left wondering whether the company was a victim of circumstances (delays in product approval due to factors beyond its control) or its own management ineptitude?  Had it spread itself too thin by trying to address diverse sectors such as beauty and medical products? Had the numerous joint ventures formed by it sapped management attention and consumed precious financial resources, ultimately leading to bankruptcy?  Regardless of the exact causes, it was clear that the events held important lessons for other business executives, especially of high-tech startup companies.
 
Click here for full paper.

2006 2006-009 (FA) WHOM CAN YOU TRUST? A STUDY OF MUTUAL FUND GOVERNANCE Meijun Qian

Investors in an open-end mutual fund can vote with their feet by withdrawing assets from or adding assets to the fund. This paper examines the effectiveness of this market monitoring mechanism in relation to the trading scandals erupted in 2003. With a sample of 92 fund families and 10220 funds*classes I find that the probability of being indicted is higher for younger funds, funds whose boards are excessively paid, and funds whose money flow is insensitive to past returns. In funds with higher flow sensitivity, there are less stale pricing and less abnormal flows, implying less opportunistic trading. These findings suggest that investors’ ability to withdraw from or add assets to funds is an effective fund governance mechanism.

JEL classifications: G23, G28.

Keywords: Flow sensitivity, market monitoring, board of directors, trading practice.
 
Click here for full paper.

2006 2006-008 (MO) EFFECTS OF INDIVIDUAL-PERCEIVED AND AGGREGATE GROUP NORMS ON ORGANIZATIONAL CITIZENSHIP BEHAVIOR Ghee Soon Lim

A conceptual distinction was made between individual-perceived and aggregate organizational citizenship behavior (OCB) norms within a group: The former reflects an individual’s internalized perceptions of the group’s OCB norms whereas the latter is a collective measure that may be indicative of situational dynamics shaping overt group OCB. We thus argued that individual-perceived and aggregate OCB norms are distinct sources of influence on an individual’s behavioral choice in a group context. Hierarchical linear modeling (HLM) results based on 747 respondents from 224 small independent retail firms showed that group aggregate helping and initiative norms impacted positively on group helping and initiative behavior, which in turn positively influenced individual helping and initiative behavior, respectively. Group aggregate helping and initiative norms also had a significantly positive direct effect on individual helping and initiative behavior, respectively. Contradicting popular beliefs, individual-perceived helping and initiative norms had a significantly negative effect on individual helping and initiative behavior, respectively. Additionally, the empirical results supported the positive moderating effect of self-monitoring on the link between individual-perceived helping norms and individual helping behavior, but not on the link between individual-perceived initiative norms and individual initiative behavior. Implications for future research were discussed.
 
Keywords: Aggregate OCB; Organizational citizenship behavior; group norms; individual-perceived norms; self-monitoring.

2006 2006-007 (MO) MULTI-LEVEL INFLUENCES ON INDIVIDUAL PERCEPTIONS OF ORGANIZATIONAL CITIZENSHIP BEHAVIOR NORMS Ghee Soon Lim

Human resource (HR) practitioners are faced with managing work groups on a daily basis. Understanding how work group culture, such as group norms, emerges thus is of paramount importance to HR practitioners looking for ways to enhance their organizations’ human capital. In the present study, we investigated how five group characteristics impacted on individual perceptions of group norms. Four multi-level sources of influence were identified to simultaneously explain how the group characteristics (i.e., task interdependence, difficulty of group goals, task cohesiveness, social cohesiveness, and communal relationships orientation) might be related to individual-perceived organizational citizenship behavior (OCB) norms. Hierarchical linear modeling (HLM) results based on 747 employees in 224 work groups in the retail sector provided support for three of the four sources. Contradicting popular beliefs, the group-level measures of goals difficulty and task cohesiveness had a negative direct impact on individual-perceived descriptive helping norms. Similarly, the group-level measure of communal relationships orientation had a negative direct impact on individual-perceived descriptive initiative norms. These counterintuitive findings and implications for future research were discussed. 
 
Keywords: Group descriptive OCB norms; multi-level effects; task interdependence; group goals difficulty; task cohesiveness; social cohesiveness; communal relationships orientation.

2006 2006-006 (MO) EFFECTS OF GROUP CHARACTERISTICS ON GROUP-LEVEL ORGANIZATION CITIZENSHIP BEHAVIOR Ghee Soon Lim

The present study examined the relationship between group characteristics and group-level organizational citizenship behavior (OCB) and whether group OCB norms played a mediating role in the relationship. We hypothesized that five group characteristics (i.e., task interdependence, goals difficulty, task cohesiveness, social cohesiveness, and communal relationships orientation) would influence group members’ perceptions of helping and initiative norms, which in turn would shape group-level helping and initiative behavior, respectively. We used the structural equation modeling technique to analyze data obtained from 224 work groups in the retail industry and found some support for the mediating roles of group helping and initiative norms, regardless of whether supervisory or members’ ratings were used to operationalize the norms. Implications for practitioners and future research were discussed.
 
Keywords: Organizational citizenship behavior; group characteristics; group norms.

2006 2006-005 (DS) OPTIMAL CONTROL OF PARALLEL MAKE-TO-STOCK QUEUES IN AN ASSEMBLY SYSTEM Jihong Ou, Heng-Qing Ye & Weiyi Ning

This paper considers an assembly system in which components are produced to stock but the final assembly of the product is made to order. Different components are produced on separate dedicated facilities. The production process for each component is modelled as an exponential make-to-stock queue and the assembly process is assumed instantaneous. Demand arrivals are modelled by a Poisson process. At each demand arrival, if all com­ponents have inventory in stock, a unit of the product is assembled to satisfy the demand; otherwise the demand is backordered which accrues penalty cost until it is satisfied. On the other hand components in inventory carry holding costs. The problem is to control the component production, based on the inventory levels of all the components in the system, to minimize the discounted total cost. We prove that the optimal control policy is dynamic in that each component should be produced up to an inventory level dependent on the inventory levels of the other components. Furthermore we show that this level is upper bounded so that production of each component is halted when its inventory reaches an absolutely high level independent of the inventory levels of the other components. We also report numerical examples and in particular observe that even the best static base stock policy can perform infinitely worse than the optimal dynamic policy.
Keywords: Assembly System, Make-to-Stock Queues, Make-to-Order Assembly, Dynamic Optimal Control, Base Stock Policy
 
Click here for full paper.

2006 2006-004 (BP) ARE AVERAGE GROWTH RATE AND VOLATILITY RELATED? Partha Chatterjee & Malik Shukayev

The empirical relationship between the average growth rate and volatility of growth rates, both over time and across countries, has important policy implications, which depend critically on the sign of the relationship. Following Ramey and Ramey (1995) a wide consensus has been building that, in the post WWII data, the correlation is negative. We replicate their result and then find that it is not robust to either the definition of growth rate or the composition of the sample. We show that the use of log difference as growth rates, as in Ramey and Ramey, creates a strong bias towards finding a negative relationship. Further, we exhaus­tively investigate this relationship for various definitions of growth rates, several datasets, across time, across countries, within groups of countries, and within US. We use different methods and control variables for this inquiry. Our analy­sis suggests that there is no significant relationship between the two variables in question.
 
JEL Codes: E32, O40.
 
Keywords: Volatility; Growth; Fluctuations

2006 2006-003 (DS) SENSITIVE TAXI: SITUATED PRACTICES AND PATTERNS OF TECHNOLOGY SENSEMAKING Ruey-Lin Hsiao, Se-Hwa Wu & Sheng-Tsung Hou

The paper examines how individuals make sense of technology and the extent to which they make use of it, an issue known as technology sensemaking. Particularly, this study explores the occasion for technology sensemaking enacted from situated practices, which results in multiple modes of technology appropriation. It is anchored in a field study of the taxi driver’s use of CabLink, which is a GPS (Global Positioning Systems) enabled vehicle dispatching system, implemented by Comfort Taxi Transportation in Singapore. The interpretative analysis of practices situated in different user communities provides an alternative method to investigate how local meanings are ascribed to a familiar technology in the post-adoption period, and assess the possible outcomes of technology use. The findings enhance the theory of technology sensemaking, and suggest practical implications for post technology adoption and global technology transfer.
 
Keywords: interpretative, technology sensemaking, situated practices, Global Positioning Systems, Comfort Taxi Transportation, CabLink, post technology adoption

2006 2006-002 (DS) A REVIEW AND ASSESSMENT OF KNOWLEDGE MANAGEMENT Thompson S. H. Teo & Bing Men

Research on Knowledge Management (KM), although still in its early stage, has made some progress. This study provides a state-of-the-art overview of research on KM, synthesizes some of the KM frameworks by proposing a classification framework for KM research, and provides insights as to the subfields within KM where research is lacking.
 
Keywords:Knowledge; Knowledge management; Review

2006 2006-001 (DS) CROSS-INDUSTRY COMPARISON OF ORGANIZATIONAL WEBSITES: AN EMPIRICAL ANALYSIS OF TOP US BANKS, BUSINESS SCHOOLS AND COMPUTER INDUSTRY WEBSITES Thompson S. H. Teo, Shirish C. Srivastava & M. S. Annapoornima

In this research we study the website content features of top 100 US firms belonging to three industries: banks, business schools and IT companies. Business schools (education) are characterized by ambiguous performance measures whereas banks have long established and clear performance metrics. IT companies represent an industry with dynamic performance measures. The choice of these three industries covers the entire spectrum of industry performance metrics. We analyze the data recorded from 243 websites: 91 IT companies, 67 business schools and 85 banks on the 22 features classified into information and interactive content. Our results show that there is considerable homogeneity in the website structure, features and functionality within each of the industries studied. Inter-industry comparisons of the website features point out significant differences in websites across the three industries.  These results posit the emergence of industry specific ‘website norms’. These industry standards or ‘website norms’ vary significantly across the different industries pointing the fact that the ‘industry specific business logic’ is the driving force for the design of websites. Study also shows that bank websites are the most advanced in terms of utilization of website features. The detailed analysis and data for the top US firms for the three industries spells out the website standards for IT companies, business schools and banks in US, which can be fruitfully utilized by organizations in improving their website design.

Keywords: website, content analysis, business school, bank, computer

NUS Business School,
Mochtar Riady Building,
15 Kent Ridge Drive,Singapore 119245

Email: askbiz@nus.edu.sg
Phone: +65 6516-3106

© Copyright 2001-2017 National University of Singapore. All Rights Reserved.
Legal | Branding guidelines | Contact Us