Research Paper Series

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Year RPS # Title Author/s
2010 2010-007 (MKTG) SELF -MEDICATION AND PLEASURE SEEKING AS DICHOTOMOUS MOTIVATIONS UNDERLYING BEHAVIORAL DISORDERS Xiuping Li, Qiang Lu & Rohan Miller

This study examines heterogeneity among consumers with behavioral disorders. In line with goal-systems theory, the authors argue that gambling and other substance dependencies are means of the same goal to self-medicators but competing goals to pure-pleasure seekers. We predict and find that pathological gamblers whose goal is self-medication are more likely to have correlated consumption disorders (e.g., other substance dependencies) than those whose goal is pure pleasure. Moreover, self-medicators demonstrate a positive correlation between the severity of gambling problems and having other substance dependencies; pleasure-seeking gamblers show a negative correlation for the same. Furthermore, because self-medicators can more easily substitute one problem consumption for another for the same goal, they are less likely to commit crimes to facilitate their gambling than pleasure seekers.
 
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2010 2010-006 (MKTG) THE EFFECT OF INTERMEDIATE REWARDS ON THE EFFECTIVENESS OF INCENTIVE PROGRAMS Xiuping Li & Dilip Soman

In this paper, we investigate individuals’ responses to incentive programs (e.g., sale force compensation or consumer loyalty programs) as a function of the structure of the programs. Across two studies in different domains, we demonstrate that a reward program with intermediate rewards even without any economic value motivates people to a greater extent than a reward program without them. More importantly, we find that the intermediate rewards are more effective at motivating desired behavior when participants are at the middle portion of the process.
 
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2010 2010-005 (MO) THE BLURRED WORK-FAMILY BOUNDARY: A STUDY ON OVERTIME WORK AND WORKING FROM HOME Zhaoli Song, Pei Chuan Wu, Yew Kwan Tong & Yongli Wang

Work can intrude into the family domain across the work-family boundary in the forms of overtime work and working from home. Guided by role theory, identity theory, and boundary theory, the current study examined antecedents and consequence of these two boundary crossing behaviors based on reports from 433 workers. Work overload was found to be positively correlated with overtime work. Role identities and desire for segregation were also found to be significantly correlated with both overtime work and working from home. Overtime work was found to be positively related to work-to-family interference. Our current study has extended the work-family literature by jointly examining both the time and space markers of the work-family boundary.
 
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2010 2010-004 (MO) WHEN HOME INVADES THE WORKPLACE AND WORK COMES HOME TO ROOST: EXAMINING BEHAVIORS THAT CROSS THE WORK-FAMILY BOUNDARY Zhaoli Song, Yew Kwan Tong & Pei Chuan Wu

To integrate the literatures on boundary theory and work-family conflict, we propose a new construct describing role behaviors which cross the traditional work-family boundary. We argue that cross boundary behavior will fill a gap in extant empirical research for a behavior-based indicator of work family interface. Conceptually, cross boundary behavior holds promise as a behavioral mediator in established models of work-family conflict, adding to our understanding of causal dynamics. We distinguish cross boundary behavior from parallel and similar constructs in the work-family and associated literatures, and also elaborate on a foundational model for testing the linkages between cross boundary behavior and work-family conflict and facilitation. Finally, implications for theory development and management practice are discussed.
 
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2010 2010-003 (MO) INSTITUTIONAL COLLISION IN CORPORATE GOVERNANCE: THE INCORPORATION OF INDEPENDENT DIRECTORS IN FAMILY FIRMS IN EMERGING ECONOMIES Chi-Nien Chung, Young-Choon Kim & Edward Zajac

We study the influence of foreign institutional investors on corporate governance reform in the context of family governance in emerging economies. Using the sample of the listed Taiwanese firms, we examine the appointment of independent directors between 2002 and 2005. Our findings show that Taiwanese firms responded to pressure of foreign institutional investors when they are weakly controlled by the family or when a firm’s CEO has been exposed to alterative governance models through formal education in the U.S. This finding supports the argument that external pressure of foreign institutional investors alone is not sufficient to realize the changes of traditional governance practices, but is moderated by the strength of family control and the alterative cognition scheme of the key decision-maker. We discuss the implication of our research on institutional change in globalized environments.

2010 2010-002 (S & P) LEAARNING FROM AGE DIFFERENCE: INTERORGANIZATIONAL LEARNING AND SURVIVAL IN JAPANESE FOREIGN SUBSIDIARIES 1986-2002 Young-Choon Kim, Jane W. Lu & Mooweon Rhee

We develop the idea of age dependent interorganizational learning, building on the inherent trade-offs of organizational aging suggested by organizational ecology and learning theories. The core idea is that an organization’s age implies different strengths and weaknesses across its life cycle, and an organization’s experience at a point in its life cycle may pose potential learning opportunities for other organizations operating at different points of their life cycle. We argue that a learning organization’s age distance from its interacting organizations captures the extent to which the value of their experience is complementary to the learning organization, and thus provides a structural condition under which its learning opportunities are bounded. Our empirical analysis of ownership-affiliated Japanese foreign subsidiaries provides strong evidence that survival is enhanced by learning from peers of different ages. The survival-enhancing learning from age difference does not apply equally to all subsidiaries, but is contingent on the age of the learning subsidiary and the relevance of the transferred experience. Our research has implications for interorganizational learning, organizational ecology, and multiunit organizational strategy.

2010 2010-001 (AC) SHAREHOLDER CHARACTERISRICS AND ACCRUALS MANIPULATION TO MEET EARNINGS TARGETS Michael S. H. Shih

This study examines how firms’ tendency to manipulate accruals to meet quarterly earnings targets, as measured by abnormal accruals volatility, relates to transient and non-transient institutional shareholdings. Abnormal accruals volatility is found to increase with transient (short-term) institutional shareholdings, but decrease with non-transient (long-term) institutional shareholdings. Robust across Jones-type models commonly used to estimate abnormal accruals, this result is consistent with transient (non-transient) institutional shareholdings putting more (less) pressure on firms to manipulate accruals than individual investors’ shareholdings. The different effects of transient and non-transient shareholdings are likely to be related to differences in investment horizons and trading strategies across institutions: while transient institutions have short investment horizons and trade on short-term earnings news, non-transient institutions have long investment horizons and are insensitive to short term earnings news.
The study also finds that estimated abnormal accruals volatility increases with analyst following, research and development expenditures, and the value-relevance of earnings, but decreases with firm size and the long-term growth rate of earnings.
 
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