Foreign Investment in Burma: Contrasting Perspectives

John R Schermerhorn Jr.

This case uses the situation of Burma or Myanmar to introduce readers to important controversies that may arise in relation to foreign investment practices in various countries. The case setting is unique in offering an opportunity to examine two very different perspectives on foreign investment in controversial settings – constructive engagement and sanctions. It poses the contrast between cultural relativism and ethical imperialism in international business ethics. It also allows for an examination of business and economic development issues in an important country in a very important part of the world – Southeast Asia.


Hope Group: The Future of Private Enterprises in China

Kevin Au and Sun Li

Hope Group was one of the largest private enterprises in China. With an initial capital of RMB250 in 1982, Liu Yonghao and his brothers built a business empire by taking advantage of opportunities available under China’s economic reforms. Hope Group became the second largest feed producer in China in 1997 and enjoyed annual sales growth exceeding 100% in recent years. The Liu brothers acquired unprofitable factories from the state, broke up local protectionism, learned from foreign competitors, and inculcated competence in the Hope Group. On route to being a major player in the world, the Liu brothers had to overcome the limitation of being a family business as well as tackle a number of external challenges.


Milano's Pizza (A, B & C)

Lau Geok Theng and Wee Chow Hou

The set of three cases on Milano’s Pizza enables students to consider marketing strategies and operations at different stages of a company’s life. In Milano’s Pizza (A), the company is expanding rapidly but is constrained by a lack of resources. This makes it difficult for the company to implement its challenger strategy effectively.
 
In Milano’s Pizza (B) case, the company was acquired by the Hour Glass Group which injected financial resources into the business. This made possible the opportunity to develop a challenger strategy against Pizza Hut in Singapore and to seriously consider the regional markets. With the increase in resources from the Hour Glass Group comes the pressure to be profitable.
 
In Milano’s Pizza (C) case, the Hour Glass Group became impatient with the lack of profitability of the company. Part of it was sold to the American pizza delivery company, Domino’s while another part of the business was sold to three senior managers of Milano’s Pizza. The latter, with only four outlets instead of 13, had to carry out a consolidation process and to achieve profitability.In Milano’s Pizza (C) case, the Hour Glass Group became impatient with the lack of profitability of the company. Part of it was sold to the American pizza delivery company, Domino’s while another part of the business was sold to three senior managers of Milano’s Pizza. The latter, with only four outlets instead of 13, had to carry out a consolidation process and to achieve profitability.


Negotiating a Joint Venture in China: The Problem of Market Access

John Allee and Douglas M Sanford Jr.

Negotiating a Joint Venture in China: The Problem of Market Access. The case presents a decision point by the chief negotiator for Mitsui & Co., Ltd., a large Japanese sogo shosha, or trading company, that is forming a joint venture located in Dalian, a coastal city in northern China in mid-1995. The Japanese contribution to the venture will be management and equipment. For this, they will receive 49% of the equity. The Chinese partners will contribute land, a building for the warehouse, and political influence. For this, they will receive 51% of the equity. The venture will be a trucking and warehousing company, but the warehouse can also be used to assemble goods using local labor and display imported goods. Each of these uses will be profitable. The decision faced by the chief negotiator involves the extent to which each of these three uses should be specified in the joint venture contract. The decision outcome depends on the relative bargaining power, negotiation style, and monitoring capabilities of the parties involved.


The Singapore Airlines Group

Nitin Pangarkar

Singapore Airlines (SIA) is world renowned for the high quality of its service. It is also, routinely, one of the world’s most profitable airlines. Its achievements are all the more remarkable given the fact there is no domestic market for air travel within Singapore. The case illustrates the positioning and organizational strategies adopted by SIA to achieve its pre-eminent position. It also illustrates the variety of competencies, mostly related to different aspects of airline operations, acquired by SIA. The unfolding Asian economic crisis, however, poses significant threats to SIA’s traditional strategy, and the airline must prove its adaptability for continued superior performance.


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